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IIgs network connectivity [message #17] Thu, 28 August 2014 18:09 Go to next message
johnb1388 is currently offline  johnb1388
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Just started looking at the Uthernet card and was quite pleased to see how simple it appeared. Has anyone had success integrating it into a conventional network using a standardized interface mechanism like Ndis?

[Updated on: Thu, 04 September 2014 16:31]

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Re: IIgs network connectivity [message #20 is a reply to message #17] Sat, 06 September 2014 07:54 Go to previous messageGo to next message
Dagen is currently offline  Dagen
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I'm not really familiar with programming the UtherNet, though I do have one. However, you should be aware that there is currently work on an UtherNet II, which promises to have a much simpler programming API. I think you can find some really good discussion of UtherNet programming on the comp.sys.apple2 newsgroup.

You can see the new card here: http://a2retrosystems.com/

And follow their dev blog here: http://www.a2retrosystems.com/blog/
Re: IIgs network connectivity [message #43 is a reply to message #17] Mon, 06 October 2014 18:33 Go to previous message
roughana is currently offline  roughana
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johnb1388 wrote on Fri, 29 August 2014 10:09
Has anyone had success integrating it into a conventional network using a standardized interface mechanism like NDIS?


Given that NDIS is a Windows mechanism, I'm not sure why you would want to do this on an Apple II. Perhaps I don't understand what you expect to be able to achieve.

Two issues that I see are software and memory space. There's no existing software that could use such a mechanism, and there's not really enough memory to put such a mechanism in place for future software to use. Case in point is Contiki: Contiki makes a lightweight TCP/IP stack available to applications that can make use of it, but it takes a fair chunk of available memory.

Instead of developing some new interface, you could treat Contiki as an interface and write new software to use that.

The Uthernet II could allow network connectivity with more memory available and perhaps an interface may help software developers. However, seeing as the Apple II is usually running only one application at a time, direct access to the Uthernet II will probably be desirable and hopefully easy enough to achieve.
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